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access to religious worship, the rights of religious organization and so on, and in the early decades of the 20 century that began to shift. the supreme court applied the national constitutional establishment and exercise clauses of the first amendment against the state, sort of centralizing debates about religion. >> host: but if the states for control, we had it written into our constitution, freedom of religion. >> guest: we did indeed that the first amendment began, congress shall i not know love so it was addressed only to the national government. >> host: were there restrictions based on religion? >> guest: of cody if there were. several states had religion establishments. some tax religious property. others band giving groups practices. i'm thinking for example eventually of various states in the southwest banning polygamy for example. >> host: so when it came to massachusetts, talk about massachusetts or pennsylvania. we are here in pennsylvania -- that's a case study of states regulating religion. >> guest: sure. pennsylvania for example had an act of blasphemy law which woul
in this family for 200 years. it was a very sad story. this person was asked what wise organic food so expensive and why are people closing so many doors to commodities instead of buying organic food? >> it is because farmers the huge subsidies was the response. because of the subsidies they don't grow organic broccoli. and she went on to call farmers greedy welfare queens, but that was the image that she gave it's not the words. so i felt really sad and upset about this. a better answer would've been because we don't have a fair market for farmers to sell into. midwestern farmers really don't have the equipment to grow vegetables to compete with california or all of the places in the developed world where our fruits and vegetables are coming from. so i went home that weekend and i started writing the outline for "foodopoly." let's start by talking about subsidies. this is not a very popular issue. people often -- their eyes glaze over. but it's a very important issue. i am not here to judge the food system. the blaming all of the ills on the food system or the 17-year-old subsidy system, distra
, the national board might let local scouting groups decide their own policies. only last july, the organization said it would keep barring openly gay people saying same-sex relations don't mesh with the scouting oath to be "morally straight." that always seemed more like a pun than a reason. but what made the board start rethinking discrimination now? well maybe corporate donors such as intel that have been putting on a lot of pressure or maybe it's the million plus signatures that supported ending the bigoted ban or maybe the scout law itself. which does require scouts to be friendly courteous kind and brave. but is it really brave if the bigotry is still optional? joining me is zach wahls an eagle scout whose speech defending his two moms' right to marry went heroicically viral. he's author of the book "my two moms." it is a pleasure. no big secret, zach, when it comes to gay rights, the boy scouts have been in the wilderness for quite a long time. how important a change is this? can we call this reform when they're still going to allow any chapters to be as bigoted as they want to be? >> abs
of the organization that emerged 10 years ago from annette young smith and carl page's work on the block where i live. annette lived across the street from me and started planting flowers here or there around the block. and that changed everything mysteriously. and we figured out over time what it was that really created the change, and it wasn't the garden. it wasn't the plants. it was that annette was unafraid to cross the street and give a hug to someone she didn't know, who was radically different from her, and she started to build a personal relationships that have become cusada gardens and now a network of people and places and projects that are really shaping the culture and life in bayview hunters point. it was -- it's been the distinct pleasure of my life, frankly, to careful where you move, it can change everything. but if you're going to move to a new place, annette young smith is the neighbor that you would pray to have. and i can tell you that she has been a terrific friend and mentor, too. she is still the chair of the board of the cusada gardens. we know it's quesada. [laughter] >> she
, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer organizations out there, we often associate breast cancer with pink ribbons and we're about to see an onslaught of ribbons in our stores, we don't identify with pink because that's mostly associated with cures and treatments and we're on prevention, we're not affiliated with other breast cancer groups, there are all different breast cancer organize sashes that do their own agenda setting and we are an independent group that we have a board that helps us make decisions as an entity, we're not focused on a cure, we focus exclusively on prevention and environmental links to the disease, we don't fund individuals and there are some amazing organizations that do that work, they'll provide extra money for treatment or food and bill payment, that's not what we do, and we don't provide direct services like support gr
joaquin for resident who ska great member of our community and has helped organize this event. (applause). . thank you very much and good evening everyone on behalf of mayorly who will be joining us in a few moments i want to say thanks to all of you for being here tonight it's always a pleasure for you go to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those who are under served typically continue to be served that our communities are strengthened and our ties are bound and strong. so, in 2012, of this year, we are very lucky enough to have two very distinguished honorees for our distinguished service a word for the city and county of san francisco and the first person we will recognize t
. and it can't all be done by community-based organizations. it is a huge. and we thank you for your support and leadership on this issue. if there are know other members who would like to comment. we can close the comment. >> supervisor olague? >> i just wanted to say that today i would like to sign my name on as a response of this important resolution and i co-response ored once before and it was met with opposition from the domestic violence which i find ironic. but, that being said, to set the record straight because the woman for accountability pack dropped 100,000 of dirty money to launch a spear campaign against me to per spet you ate misinformation it does not make it true, that money would be better spent going to domestic violence programs and shelters, what i and everyone else have learned from this experience is that there are certain faction in our political movement who will go to any length including exploiting an issue as important as domestic violence, i will not let this stop me from doing what i know and passionately believe is the right thing to do. in this case the right
] but we have to also keep in mind that this industry needs to be more and more organized in order to have the political organization as one supervisor, or two supervisors, there is only so much you can do. please come and get more organized. my colleagues, david and my colleagues need to hear from you. build an alliance with the business community. one of the biggest champions is that california chamber of commerce. we know it is good for business. and please, organized with the neighborhood bars. there are so many great neighborhood bars in this city that could add that neighborhood element to political organizing. and when you are a district supervisor, it is one thing to have nightclub owners come to you. it is another thing to have neighborhood business owners like bar owners coming to you. we need to organize as a bar owner and that will move us in a positive direction. i am optimistic about the future of night life in this city. i think we have turned a corner. there's a broader and broader consensus that this matters for the broader culture of san francisco. thank you. [applause] f
the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community leaders who are dedicated to the same principles and are positively changing our communities. the effect that one person can have in a community is truly inspiring. and it's that inspiration that drives each one of us to go out there and be a part of something bigger. i congratulate every award winner here tonight and let's not forget that every person here has the power to make a difference. i want to especially thank daniel and his team for being such instrumental leaders here in city hall on behalf of all communities and neighborhoods in san francisco. with that said, welcome and enjoy tonight's event. (applause) >> thank you, christina. so, before we jump into the fire works, as you would say, let's take a few seconds here and just go over some of the elements of tonight's event. so, tonight we're going to be givin
period why is organic food so expensive, and why are people growing so many commodities instead of organic food? and this person answered and, you know, with a straight face it's because farmers get huge subsidies and because of the subsidies today don't grow organic broccoli. and then she went on to basically call farmers greedy welfare queens. i mean, not using that language, but that was the image. so i felt, i felt really saddened and upset about this because a better answer would have been because we don't have a fair market for farmers to sell into. and midwestern farmers really don't have the equipment to grow vegetables or the climate to compete with california or all of the places in the developed world where our fruits and vegetables are coming from. so i went home that weekend, and i started writing the outline for "foodopoly." so let's start by talking about subsidies. i mean, this is not a very popular issue, and people often their eyes glaze over. but it's a very important issue. now, i am not here to justify the subsidy system. obviously, it's bad public policy. b
salasar organizations the program as well as the out reach efforts. miss marion through the work as the occ attorney engages in out reach through the contacts with the members of the community and the police department as she proposes and drafts new policies for the police department. >> the purpose of tonight's report is to set forth the occ's out reach goals for 2013 and to summarize the occ's progress in carrying out the strategic plan in 2011, 2012. we are a small city department but we use a community based approach that continually builds upon our existing partnership and through this we have been able to maximize our resources and out reach efforts both in 2011, and 2012. in addition, to providing information about our services, our out reach efforts include gathering information from stake holders about the policing issues that are of concern to their communities. the information that we received is vital in shaping our policy, objective and priorities. and we work in partnership with community groups and other city agencies and the police department. and we seek to find
media organization we are committed to this and in november we are celebrating american heritage indian month with special programs on our television channels including kqed and plus and world. many are provided by native american public television which is actually an organization that produces indian producers and countries with partnership with public television and radio, so it's a fantastic organization and they have shared a lot of unique programs with us. two highlights are racing the redses, a rare view into reservation life homeland, native americans in the armed forces. you will get to meet the four local heroes. that's the term we like to use and people in the community that wins a award that is very special and i think it's important to thank the city of san francisco for hosting this event. -- plawz. thank you. this is really quite a beautiful space and honor to be standing at the base of the stair case and this incredible rotunda and i want to thank the dancers and singers and drummers for sharing their heritage with us and just adds to this special event and be sur
unionized workers and for that matter, nonunion workers across the country. should organized labor support the reforms we've seen so far? >> well, i think that labor is united. we all support legalization and a path to citizenship for undocumented workers. for one very simple reason. we believe that taking these 11 million people and legalizing them and giving them the same rights, the same obligations the same responsibilities as any other american will help lift wages for everybody because they will not be at the mercy of employers who tend to exploit them and because of their status. so i think that this is a good thing for workers and besides you know i think that anybody that's working here should have the same rights. there should not be anything like a second class american worker in this country. >> john: i agree with you on that one. but let me ask since you were there today for the president's speech do you anticipate any pushback from conservative latinos over the president's reported same-sex marriage proposals as part of this reform bill? >> i don't think so because at the end
issue, work in your community. work in the organizing around the issue. link up with groups doing work. if it is student debt, find ways to take on the banks, local legislators, and congress in the short term. is not very revolutionary. at the event we did on 9/11, i said i felt this country was in a pre-revolutionary moment. it was about a week before occupy was street launched. i believe in evolution, not revolution. >> katrina, did you read the foreign affairs article that backs up the occupy movement? there was a recent article about the new progressive movement. there is more coming out about the occupy agenda and what they want. you have articulated some of the agenda. geoffrey sax talked about three- regulating the market -- regulating the market. it is all there. why is it not been articulated by the media? >> i think it is. it is not up to -- different occupy's have different demands. it is up to people like "the nation" and other groups like rebuild the dream, national people's action, the progressive caucus. occupy wall street is a spirit. they're committed at the moment to
of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful organization to be involved with obviously coming from buy right where really everyone is treated very much like family. coming into 18 reasons which even more community focused is such a treat. we have these events in the evening and we really try and bring people together. people come in in groups, meet friends that they didn't even know they had before. our whole set up is focused on communal table. you can sit across from someone and start a conversation. we're excited about that. >> i never worked in catering or food service before. it's been really fun learning about where things are coming from, where things are
to the city for the whole organization involved. congratulations on a wonderful, wch championship for all of san francisco, the best fans in the world. [cheers and applause] now larry there's something else that you got to know. i'm going to clean up. when a world series champion sweeps the opponents they deserve something special, so as the former public works director i know a little bit about sweeping and we have a little love for the whole team. the first of many i hope, and this is the broom to the city for the giants, the first ever. yes! congratulations on sweeping the world series championship. >> thank you mr. mayor. both the broom and the key will find a sacred place at at&t park because it belongs to the wonderful fans of the san francisco giants, the best fans in the world. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> well, we just saw him but i wanted to give a formal introduction to a guy that has meant so much to this franchise, who grew up in san francisco rooting for the giantses and become a critical part of this giants organization, the giants president laurence baer. [che
and approval. this proposed ordinance is endorsed by quite a few community organizations including the san francisco asthma task force, the tobacco free coalition, the african american tobacco control leadership council, philipino american leadership council, freedom from tobacco, girls afterschool academy and sunset russian tobacco education project and many more. i also will be introducing a couple minor amendments that i will mention kind of towards the end, but i wanted to say that we're not going to have a formal presentation but i wanted to thank karen nikovoli and rosalee from breathe california for their great work in crafting this legislation and working with many event coordinators as well. miss labasee and miss shanban are here as well. let's open this up for public comment. i know we have a number of speaks from breathe california and other organizations as well. if you would like to speak, please come forward. is karen nikoboli in the audience? if anyone else would like to speak, please line up on the side of the room if you can. >> good afternoon, my name is ernestine wei
into negotiation with the employers' organizations and with employers, telling them that it is not only a problem of the public, but also a problem of their own companies. it worked. after half a year of talking, 17 companies directly signed the agreement, also some americans among them. it was quite a lot. we made a program for motivating employees working at home. it is quite easy to work from home, do your work from where you are, making smart working centers. it is better than if you need to go to an office. you do not need to go to your office. there are also similar programs for bicycles. we also worked on business areas. !Ñppwe started sharing bicycles, scooters, car sharing, people who live in the same village for the same street, different companies, we brought them together so they could share a vehicle. we also were in discussion with the local authorities about optimizing the public transport. if you know how many people work in an area and you know where they live, it is much easier to negotiate a direct line for public transport. what we also did we organized a bureau that was help
. the u.s. official told me this afternoon that as of now the attack appeared organized. as we have been reporting for many months al qaeda inspired and linked groups are flourishing. we spoke to a military leader in the islamist group which has taken over and terized northern mali. he is working with one of the most senior leaders in africa who has claimed responsibility for today's attack. the fate of the hostages, they are at risk because things have to change. we cover the story from every angle and we will be speaking with mike rogers and chairman ed rice. we begin with cnn pentagon correspondent. this has been developing throughout the day and we have been struggling to chase this down and get the details. the u.s. government says it is taking the lead on the hostage situation. what is it doing tonight to make sure that the americans being held hostage are safe. >> the first thing they gave was to get satellite surveillance over that area which means that the fbi can now monitor to some extent what is happening on the ground. the next thing that the u.s. military did was upgrade th
purchasing more books in different buildings throughout the city. later there was another organization called the providence athenaeum that formed in 1831. in 1836, the providence athenaeum was formed as a result of these two organizations. and we ended up being in the arcade downtown for a couple of years while this property was being built, and then we moved in here in 1838. we open our doors onto what was the marketplace at that time. the former president of brown university gave us the doors that are wide open in and the crowd gathers, and he's talking about the four sides of the city of providence. so each state should mention the historical evidence of this building is quite profound. the building itself from the original building was built in 1838. the architect was william strickland, who was a young architect, one of the early founders and this is one of his only examples of three revival architecture in the city. the athenaeum is special in many ways. i can get a special obviously from what we see visually. this is just an amazing space. while the viewers cannot experience actually
housing part of in project. as somebody who organizes with [speaker not understood] in the mission and can only stay in the mission because of the my control [speaker not understood], they respect the neighborhood and are a vital part of the community. many of us who live and work in the mission, long-time merchants working on mission street and valencia street commercial corridors have rents tripled, as you heard, as building owners see more up scape restaurants and boutiques coming in, and want to clear the space out for higher rents. as these family owned businesses are evicted and lose their livelihood, they're having a difficulty paying for rent or mortgages and are being pushed into [speaker not understood]. these take away places that low-income people in the mission can shop and eat. the corridor becomes only for those who have more money. so, adding 100 plus condos to that stretch of the mission will exacerbate the issue for many of these small businesses and the people that live in the community. unless we see a very robust community benefits agreement, that will establish a fund
of dolores street community services. and as you might know, our organization has been in the neighborhood for 30 years providing services to the homeless community and also affordable housing. you've heard a lot of community support today. our perspective as an organization who does this kind of work may be a little bit different, again, because of some of the impacts it has on the communities that we work with. we were involved in the process with the developer [speaker not understood] inclusionary requirement through the land dedication. and, so, we continue to support that option allowing lower income residents to be able to stay in the neighborhood. and also we look forward to continuing to work with the mayor's office of housing to clarify guidelines and procedures to make land dedication viable for future developments, to counter gentrification and also ensure that our community receives its fair share of affordable housing that's equivalent to other inclusionary requirements. i also just wanted to say briefly, we do operate two affordable housing sites in the neighborhood. and we a
it a terrorist attack. a u.s. official told me as of now the attack appeared organized, not spontaneous. al qaeda linked groups are flourishing. we spoke to a leader in the islamic group. he is working with one of al qaeda's most senior leaders, mokhtar mel mokhtar. >> the fate of these hostages, they are at risk, because things have to change. that's what he said. tonight, we cover the story from every angle. we will be speaking with mike rogers and ed royce. >>> we begin with cnn pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. obviously, this has been developing throughout the day. we have been struggling to chase this down and get the details. the u.s. government says it is taking the lead on the hostage situation. what is it doing to make sure the americans who are being held hostage are safe? >> erin, the first thing they did was to get some satellite surveillance over that area which means that the fbi can now monitor to some extent what is happening on the grown. the next thing the u.s. military did was upgrade the readiness sat tus of the so-called commander's in extremists force, the small letha
. >> that is very hopeful. in order to get a broad representation of questions, we asked student organizations to formulate questions for his excellency. the first organization out like to call is the international development club. >> good evening, mr. president, and thank you for being with us tonight. i am chair of the international relations club. close enough. my question to you on behalf of my organization is this. if from a security perspective, one of the greatest concerns is that al qaeda will rebound and afghan the stand will become a terrorist state. how can you mitigate without risking green on blue attacks? >> one of the reasons the united states will continue a presence in afghanistan after 2014 in certain facilities, it is because we have decided to gather to continue to fight against al qaeda. there will be no respite in that. we will continue to work, and they will not. they are decimated, largely, and on their way out. when i receive security, we have meetings on security issues and we never come across the question whether it is a threat. the fact that the fight will continu
national organization whether from syria or north africa or wherever. six questions. first the key strategic question good vs. bad the the shapes the local of firemen and fundamentally frames how they will interacting with the organization that has the most power on the ground but the next leader overtime did have a better relationship with the pakistan need government than others in the fatah coming into power in 2004 after his primary rival was killed by the drones and he was in a prison that allowed for a lot of negotiation and was released and took a leading role in south waziristan. so it was ended but his leadership also started with the drone strike as well. where the tribal and social roots? it is a key question. looking at conflicts of the organization's and workspace united states, often not the most crucial to those on the ground and sometimes it is difficult to understand. those other questions that they ask. who can i trust? to can i not trust? sow developed a policy that is the question we have to ask what about the relationship of foreign fighters? what kind? overtim
of a women's peace organization that was started of women that came together to add world war i. you might know jane addams and our comrade, but it has continued in the work continues not only at an international level, but a local level. our colleagues in congo, for example, i was thinking of them when you were speaking, cynthia, because they always say where we was talking about sexual island, but when i come to the u.s., nobody satisfies the u.s. government continuing to sell arms in the eastern drc. these are critical to 1325 and why our organization was one of the key organizations that pushed for a feminist resolution. a revolution of the antiwar, not the phrase making were safe or women and it becomes a key tool for colleagues working in the middle of conflict situations, whether in palestine with the drc and the u. s., at the race are using 1325 to say this is not about instruments wising women in foreign policy. it's not about saving women in afghanistan. it's about looking on around policies in terms to thinking about how does the u.s. itself militarize their own security? lessee
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 5,716 (some duplicates have been removed)